The Death of Modern Marketing

Customers are not just data. They are human beings with beating hearts.

Edneil Jocusol

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Any field — arts or science — when infused with the term “modern” creates a hype that turns all traditional thinking upside down. Marketing is one of them.

Photo by Mateus Campos Felipe on Unsplash

The study conducted by Mckinsey and Company in 2020 on Modern Marketing is immersive, data-driven, and very timely. It allows technical entrepreneurs like me to look around my environment and assess what else have I reluctantly refused to listen to? For me, modern marketing is about listening and doing.

MODERNIZATION: Humane approach

In my observation, the advent and availability of data have made most of the businesses look at consumers like pieces of inanimate objects only. We have seen the abuse of such behaviors in social media, where we got fed up with information we don’t need and have influenced our judgment by only knowing very few facts. We were given information to lead us into where the marketers want us to go, and we were blindsided. Modern marketing is about treating consumers humanely, the exact opposite.

The advent and availability of information have made most the businesses look at consumers like pieces of inanimate objects only.

Even back in the early years, Hutchinson (1952) argued that marketing is not a science because it does not adhere to the essential criteria of a scientific approach. A more realistic perspective reveals it to be an art. Science and art are like oil and water. They both have their own language. Even when mixed and rapidly shaken, they still find ways to settle on their own territories. Both are beautiful in their own ways.

Twenty-seven years after, Laczniak et al (1979) came up with three assertions to sum up “social marketing”, claiming that: (1) it is a two-edged sword that has the ability to generate big ethical issues while also having enormous benefit, (2) professional licensure or governmental monitoring of such activity at that time is inappropriate or premature, and (3) it appears to be difficult to distinguish the ethics of applying marketing tactics to social concepts and initiatives from the ethics of the ideas themselves when assessing social marketing from an ethical viewpoint.

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Edneil Jocusol

I write my observations on society, business/entrepreneurship, and technology/engineering.